What We Learned at Social Media Marketing World

Every spring, 7,000 marketers from dozens of industries gather in San Diego at the country’s largest social media conference. We sent Benson’s digital marketing team to Social Media Marketing World to keep up with the latest trends and tools. In this blog, we share our five key takeaways from this year’s event. None of this will be new information exactly, but it was reassuring to hear confirmation of these trends.

Bigger isn’t always better

While gaining more follows should be an ongoing goal for your social media account, don’t assume that more fans equals more success. It’s better to have a smaller audience who cares than a larger audience who doesn’t. So focus on engaging the audience you do have by prioritizing social listening and sharpening your brand messaging strategy. Vanity metrics won’t love you back the way loyal fans will.

Focus, with flexibility

Spend your efforts on what you do best. Seeing a high number of shares when you post videos on Facebook? Spend more time on making videos than on photo shoots. Of course, leave room to readjust strategy. Monitoring metrics closely helps keep an eye on shifts in audience preferences.

Something isn’t better than nothing

Choose a primary platform for your brand’s social media communications. Have a highly engaged audience on Twitter? Put most of your time into developing customized content for Twitter; engage with your followers there. Design content that’s optimized for your focus platform, and then repost it on other channels.

Be conscious of your audience’s attention

Audiences have less trust in brands now than ever before. How does this translate into developing a wine brand’s social media strategy? Only talk if you have something to say, because redundant or generic content only contributes to the static. Be conscious of your audience’s attention by posting intentionally and choosing quality over quantity of messages.

The future of social media is relatability

Instagram and Facebook stories. Private messaging. We’re all seeing a shift towards more personalized and meaningful communication on social, in large part due to privacy concerns. Brands find success by doing less broadcasting and more human interacting. At Benson, we connect with our clients’ fans through commenting on and liking their posts, even when they don’t overtly reference wine.

Case study: One of our winery clients was struggling to grow their audience on Instagram. Through our community management tactic of interacting with followers posting about wine-adjacent topics like home entertaining and cooking, we were able to achieve 10% organic follower growth month over month.

Similarly, sharing content posted by followers and winery employees creates more personalized messaging. And we recommend taking the digital conversation a step further by utilizing private messages to communicate with fans.

At Benson, our team education efforts are ongoing. In case your missed it, here were the top takeaways from our visit to Direct to Consumer Wine Symposium in January.

5 Post-Campaign Tips

In most cases, we design influencer partnerships with the goal of attracting prospective consumers into our clients’ digital ecosystems. Creating and executing a campaign is only part of the process; if you really want to spike the results, here are some post-campaign recommendations.

Maintain a relationship with your influencer partner

Partnering with a social media influencer yields a multitude of benefits for a wine and spirits brand including one that might go unnoticed at first glance – ongoing relationships. Just because the campaign is over does not mean the relationship is over. Continue to engage with the influencer and reach their audienceby liking and commenting on their social channels to increase impressions. It maintains the association with your brand and keeps the door open for future partnerships. Your brand will gain reputation benefits among other influencers (potential future partners) by being in your partner’s inner circle.

Case study: After a campaign with the 100 Layer Cake blog, our client has continued to be mentioned on the blog, and therefore, continued to generate brand impressions and engage prospective consumers. It was the right influencer for the right wine, and vice versa.

Repurpose influencer content

Include reposting and linking back to influencer-published content in your editorial calendar. Repurpose materials that were already published, such as by re-posting photos in different social media channels, cropping photos for a new perspective, or editing text to match the season. Repurposing and re-imagining your new content makes the influencer investment even more worthwhile.

Utilize unused content

Make use of the assets created by the influencer partnership that may not have been used during the initial campaign run. A strategic influencer partnership plan has clear guidelines for asset creation and if your plan included extra deliverables beyond the campaign needs, incorporate them into your future editorial calendar. You chose a partner based on the brand fit and quality of the influencer work, so revel in the success of your selection and utilize those assets.

You bought it; you own it. Your campaign agreement should include a stipulation that all work, regardless of whether it is posted, is a “work made for hire.”

Prepare for the ripple effect

In some cases, influencers’ friends become a part of the campaign simply by being in their orbit. We have a winery client whose partner invited her influencer friends to an event at the winery. These influencers wrote unsponsored blogs about the experience and the brand was able to comment on these blogs to increase impressions. In other instances, influencers are so captivated by the campaign that they will write about your brand on their own. Expect this amplification and engage with the influencers who are the right fit by liking and commenting on their posts.

Case study:  One of our clients partnered with over 60 influencers in 2018. As a result of their great reputation and product, many influencers hope to work with this brand – and they feature the brand in unsponsored posts in hopes of gaining that opportunity.

Strengthen your digital community

Liking and responding to the comments from the followers gained during the campaign will further cultivate trust with your new audience. Actively engage with your growing community because social media is, after all, social.

If you’ve read through to the end of our four-part blog series, thank you! Tell us what you think – what did we miss? What did we nail? What topics should we cover next?

 

In case you missed it, here are links to the first three posts in the series:

Part 1 – 6 Reasons to Use Influencer Partnerships

Part 2 – 8 Tips for Selecting a Wine Influencer Partner

Part 3 – 5 Tips for Running a Successful Influencer Marketing Partnerhip

5 Tips for Running a Successful Influencer Marketing Partnership

Once you’ve selected the right influencer partner for your wine or spirits brand, and developed goals, then you’ll dive into executing your campaign. Here are some suggestions.

Choose your Campaign Type

What will you ask the influencer to do? Here are some options (not mutually exclusive):

  • Sponsored social media posts: they post about your brand on their social channels
  • Sponsored blog posts: they blog about your brand on their site
  • Sponsored giveaways: they run a consumer contest or promotion sponsored by your brand
  • Social media takeovers: they create all content for your social channels for a day or more
  • Hosted events: they create an event with other bloggers that features your brand
  • Guest blogging: they write blog posts for your website

Your campaign goals and budget will influence the type of campaign. Here are some general guidelines:

  • Want more fans and engagement? A longer-term partnership with a series of social media posts will work better than just a few posts. So think two months and not one week.
  • Want to educate new, prospective consumers? Then a sponsored blog post will reach their followers.
  • Want to increase your digital footprint? A hosted event can reach your partners as well as other bloggers who attend (because they will also post about it).
  • Want to freshen up your social content? A guest blogger or takeover can really jazz up photos and text.

And don’t forget that influencer marketing partnerships can creatively address business opportunities using outside-the-box ideas. Here are two initiatives we conducted last year with clients:

Outline a Campaign Brief

After you’ve chosen an influencer whose work aligns with your brand, it is vital to provide a written campaign brief that includes content guidelines. Don’t assume they know your brand! Provide clear direction and expectations, such as:

  • Campaign timeline
  • Number of content pieces
  • When the content will be submitted for approval
  • Approval turnaround timeframes
  • When and where the content will be published
  • Campaign goals
  • Metrics to be reported during and after the campaign

Pro Tip: Sometimes we include a report template – such as an excel chart with all relevant KPIs and spaces for them to fill in actual figures – so that we can more easily measure results against goals without having to translate their reporting. 

Create a Contract

Is your partner contractually obligated to meet or exceed your key KPIs? They should be. Create a written “scope of work” or “memo of understanding” that covers the campaign obligations and make sure both parties sign a copy before the campaign begins. Include a requirement that all influencer-created content is a “work made for hire” and you own the IP, whether it is used in posts or not.

Review, Approve, and Watch the Content Go Live

It’s your brand, so protect it!  Your influencer will submit content for your final approval – review it carefully and provide timely, clear and constructive feedback so you both are aligned. As we discuss in our blog “8 Tips for Selecting a Wine Influencer Partner”, your brand may be held responsible for any content published through your partnership. Ensure your partner’s content follows industry guidelines and legal regulations.

Once the content goes live, interact with it! Share it. Comment on it. Like it. When your brand engages with the influencer partner’s content, it further strengthens your association.

Gather Data, Analyze, and Adjust

Once your campaign is live, dive into the metrics early in the campaign. If you are not hitting your KPIs, you can make mid-course corrections. Look at engagement numbers and types of engagements – do they make sense? Is the tone and voice supporting your brand identity?  Read some comments and see if those people fit your target demographic group(s).

At the end of the campaign, document a post mortem.  What worked? What didn’t? What will you do differently next time? Use the results to refine future campaign strategies and follow our recommendations for making the most of the post-campaign benefits.

Hopefully, we’ve provided some practical tips for executing a campaign. In our fourth and final post in this series, we will address how to really spike your results with post-campaign actions!

8 Tips for Selecting a Wine Influencer Partner

Now that we’ve shared why you should partner with a social media influencer, here are top tips for researching and vetting potential partners. We implement these steps for clients like Hahn Family Winery, Wines of Languedoc, J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines, Geyser Peak Winery, and others.

1. Determine your campaign goals

You won’t achieve your goals if you don’t define them. That is, make sure your campaign is optimized to meet your goals. Determining realistic benchmarks will depend on the size of your current social media accounts, as well as the metrics for your influencer partner. Set the following goals before choosing an influencer:

  • Social Media Follower Growth: 25%? 50% this year?
  • Impressions: Need to reach a mass or micro target audience?
  • Reach: Maybe, like some of our clients, you want to reach wine buyers who don’t necessarily read about wine?
  • Engagements: Want to increase shares, likes and comments?
  • Target demographic: Want to reach more Millennials? Consumers in New York? Luxury buyers?

Once you have identified these goals, you’ll be able to identify an influencer(s) with the right follower count, as well as the key questions you’ll need answered in order to select the best partner.

2. Ensure the influencer’s visual identity is a good match for your brand

Influencers grow their audiences by building, and fiercely protecting, their personal brand. As you scroll through the feed of a potential match, take note of their photo styling. Does their look align with your brand? An influencer known for their richly textured food and wine styling wouldn’t be an appropriate match for a winery with a crisp and clean visual style. Although your marketing team will provide guidelines for content creation, don’t expect a potential partner to dramatically change their style. At the end of the day, you’ll have to trust this person to speak on your behalf. And you’ll reaffirm your brand identity by working with an influencer whose imagery and tone of writing aligns with yours.

Case study: Hahn Family Winery (see logo below) partnered with Drinking with Chickens; a perfect visual partnership.

 

3. Review the influencer’s past partnerships

Evaluate previous paid content on the influencer’s page. This will allow you to see both how the influencer presents sponsored products as well as what types of products they promote. If you’re a luxury wine brand, you should ensure that the potential influencer frequently advertises premium products.

Pro tip: Don’t be scared off if an influencer has worked with your direct competitors. This could be a great sign that their audience will be interested in your brand.

4. Consider the influencer’s audience location

Make note of where the influencer and their audience are located. Consider if you need to coordinate an in-person event or photoshoot. Make sure you can legally ship wine to the influencer. Look at the language in the comments section and at the profiles of engaged followers to determine audience location.

5. Check for fake followers

A primary goal in selecting a partner is choosing one with an audience who will be interested in your brand. Fake followers are an increasing concern. Follower count is meaningless if the audience isn’t real; it defeats your marketing objectives and might even damage your brand’s integrity. Have your marketing team or agency vet potential partners for fake followers by checking for warning signs like a sudden spike in followers. Another cause for concern is a nearly 1:1 follower-to-following ratio which indicates the use of automation services to spur follower growth – real influencers do not follow thousands of accounts.

6. Make sure the influencer follows guidelines for industry responsibility 

In the court of public opinion, and potentially the court of law, sponsoring an influencer can be seen as condoning their behavior. Evaluate the way partners run their accounts. Here are some red flags:

  • Promoting overconsumption
  • Promoting drinking alone
  • Claiming alcohol has health benefits
  • Not clearly indicating sponsored content — an #Ad should be in the caption of every sponsored post
  • Running alcohol giveaways
  • Drinking alcohol while pregnant
  • Promoting consumption by minors
  • Featuring people that appear under 25

Everyone working in social media on a wine brand should review and adhere to the Wine Institute guidelines for digital marketing and advertising.

7. Your budget will determine the right influencer

Every influencer sets their own prices, and costs will vary depending on their follower count. Consider your budget and campaign components when determining where you’ll get the most bang for your buck. While a macro-influencer partnership is likely to spur larger follower growth in a shorter amount of time, we often recommend partnering with a micro-influencer to reach a niche audience (engagement rates can be much higher).

8. Request Media Kits and Proposals

Normally, we vet prospective partners to create a shortlist of 10-30 influencers, and request media kits and proposals from 5-15 identified as the best potential matches. Next, request a media kit. Influencers should be able to provide:

  • Audience breakdown by location, age and gender
  • Time of day their audience is active (to identify time zone)
  • Average impressions per social media post
  • Average engagements
  • Unique monthly page views to blog
  • Timeframe for production
  • Breakdown of fees for photography, blogs, videos, events, etc.

Now that we’ve discussed why to use influencers and how to research and vet them, we now turn to best practices for executing a campaign.

Benson France Retained by BIVC

Benson’s French office has been retained for a domestic PR campaign for the the BIVC, the Bureau Interprofessionnel des Vins du Centre-Loire. The program is designed to reinforce awareness of the Centre-Loire’s white wines – the birthplace of Sauvingon Blanc – as well as to encourage discovery of the “new” appellations and the region’s red and rosé wines.

Founded in 1994, the BIVC brings together 8 AOC and 2 IGP: Sancerre, Pouilly-Fumé and Pouilly-sur-Loire, Menetou-Salon, Quincy, Reuilly, Coteaux du Giennois, Châteaumeillant, Côtes de Charity, Coteaux de Tannay.

6 Reasons to Use Influencer Partnerships

Influencer partnerships reinforce your brand’s identity, introduce your brand to prospective customers,  build your Instagram base, and can even improve search engine results.

These campaigns are increasingly successful for our clients, so we decided to share some insights in a four-part series.

First, for the sake of this series of posts, we define influencers as bloggers who create photos, videos, and posts, as well as run events and giveaways. Many are small media companies with subject matter expertise and attract a loyal following. In other words, we are not defining influencers in this series as sommeliers, retail buyers, journalists, etc.

So why work with influencers? Here are six reasons.

1. Amplify your brand identity

You are the company you keep. By partnering with reputable influencers whose visual style and tone (i.e., their point of view, syntax, level of formality, etc.) complement your own brand, you strengthen your brand’s identity.

But first, make sure you vet potential partners to ensure their photography and writing style aligns with your brand. For example, a traditional, iconic Napa Valley luxury brand won’t benefit by partnering with a sassy, irreverent blogger.

2. Increase awareness with targeted, prospective customers

Our client campaigns are often designed with goals such as targeting potential customers in their late 20s and 30s or reaching wine drinkers who don’t read wine columns but do follow home décor or home entertaining influencers. Based on an influencer’s followers, your brand can get exposure to these “pools” of future customers, often at a competitive CPM (cost per thousand impressions), and in an editorial environment that isn’t saturated with your competitors. (And, by the way, these programs can complement a targeted PR campaign, but that’s a subject for a future post.)

Case study: By partnering with female influencers, we helped a client in 2018 increase the percentage of female Instagram audience from 65% to 72%.

3. Influencer opinions are more trusted than ads

Followers are attracted to influencers who inspire new ideas and serve as an “editor” of current topics, trends and products. Good influencers are the Sherpas of their domain. By providing valuable insights, experience and practical advice, they drive loyalty and trust. And people trust endorsements. According to Nielsen’s Global Trust in Advertising Report, 66% of the consumers in the U.S. trust recommendations from opinions while only 46% trust ads on social networks1.

4. Grow your Instagram audience

Fanning ads on Instagram, unlike Facebook, are not an option. But influencer partnerships can reach large audiences of prospective customers and help boost follower acquisition more quickly than “organic” growth alone; that is, just relying on followers engaging with your posts. Put another way, influencer-created content has a better opportunity of being discovered than organic content or traditional social media advertisements alone.

Case study: One of our winery clients doubled their Instagram audience from 3,500 to 7,000 followers in 2018 as a result of influencer partnerships.

5. Rank higher in search results

Both the quality and number of links to your root domain positively affect your SEO value. It might be an unexpected reason to work with social media influencers but doing so can increase your search engine rankings. Additionally, keyword optimization in your influencer partner’s content can also affect your brand’s ranking. Both of these benefits help drive more traffic to your website, which could drive more email signups, online purchases, winery visits and more.

6. Create new content for your brand

Influencers are in the business of creating content. So, the terms of your partnership contract should include usage rights for their photos, texts and posts. Tap their creative energy to refresh your image library, because your in-house team probably doesn’t have the time!

Now that we’ve made our case for why to partner with an influencer partner, read our second post in this series: how to select a wine influencer partner.

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Freemark Abbey and Benson Team Up

Freemark Abbey Winery and Benson are teaming up on a marketing communications campaign to drive awareness, visitors center traffic and sales for this iconic Napa Valley winery. The winery is lauded for crafting classically structured Cabernet Sauvignon from pedigreed vineyard sites, and is widely known for its  Bosché and Sycamore single-vineyard Cabernets from Rutherford.

Freemark Abbey’s estate underwent a multi-million-dollar renovation that was completed in 2016. The redesign captures the winery’s historical significance while providing a welcoming, immersive and thoroughly modern consumer experience.

Freemark Abbey Winery is part of Jackson Family Wines, a family owned portfolio of wineries and vineyards spanning significant wine-growing regions across California, Oregon, France, Italy, Australia, Chile and South Africa. In each region, vineyard ownership remains key to exceptional quality and environmental stewardship for future generations. Founded in 1982 by wine pioneer Jess Jackson, the wine company is led by Chairman Barbara Banke and the Jackson family.  www.jacksonfamilywines.com.

8 Things We Learned at the 2019 DTC Wine Symposium

Every year, the DTC Wine Symposium addresses the timely issues affecting direct to consumer marketing and sales. Group panels and keynote speakers zero in on what managers need to know now in the context of a rapidly changing sales channel.

Our team identified several actionable takeaways from this year’s symposium. In no particular order, here are eight.

Micro-influencers are misunderstood

At Benson, we engage influencers in “wine-adjacent” lifestyle topics such as home entertaining, décor, and travel to pull new consumers into our clients’ digital ecosystems. So while our clients have had success with these programs, it was fascinating for us to hear DTC managers’ perspective – many complained that micro-influencers are always asking for comp’d tastings! Our suggestion: shuffle influencer inquiries to the PR team or your PR agency for vetting to ensure that consistent brand messages are shared and the most is made from their visit.

Rules governing social media are evolving

Making the wrong move on social media, even accidentally, can result in loss of license or severe fines. Thankfully, Tracy Genesen at Wine Institute shared some important rules and best practices for staying legal on social media. These are the key lessons we walked away with:

  • Put your social media in the hands of industry-savvy professionals you trust
  • Get all stakeholders on the same page on what is and isn’t legal before starting social media program.
  • Don’t assume previous rules are still in effect.

At Benson, our team stays up to date on regulations in the wine and spirit space, better protecting our digital marketing clients. Should you have specific questions about what is and isn’t legal in your marketing campaigns, we recommend referring to The Wine Institute for more information.

Social media is often overlooked

Social media is not always valued as an important part of the overall marketing communication strategy. We heard that some DTC managers of smaller wineries view social media as an optional extra that might be tacked onto an employee’s existing job duties. With this mentality, social is simply not used to its full potential – as part of a comprehensive marketing strategy. Social media can be utilized to strengthen bonds with your existing fanbase, to share time-sensitive information, to encourage online sales and in-person visits, and moreover, to communicate your brand story to a new audience. In planning out your brand’s social media content and putting attention into community management, your holistic marketing strategy is immediately strengthened – as well as your ability to reach a wider (and often, younger) demographic.

The wine industry is overlooking female consumers

… and missing out on the 7 trillion dollars they spend in the US each year. The previously dependable “older male, wine collector” customer persona is increasingly becoming a relic of the past. To keep up with the times, Kristi Faulkner of WomenKind urged DTCWS attendees not to underestimate the buying power, and wine interest, American women possess. If you’re ready to take the jump, don’t assume marketing to women will be similar to your previous tactics. Kristi recommends to:

  • Create an immersive/engaging experience in your tasting room
  • Draw your female customers into the story of the brand
  • Create an emotional experience for her, as it is more likely to be remembered

The key question tasting room managers should be asking themselves is: When a woman walks into your winery, what senses can you engage in the first five minutes?

Creating a personal online experience is key

Commerce7’s sponsor session “3 Transformational Changes Impacting the Digital Customer Experience and How to Apply them to Your DTC Program” hammered one key point home: consumers want to build a relationship with your brand. Some digitally savvy wineries achieve this online through smart member dashboards and segmented email lists. Our take: don’t overlook community management. One of the most direct ways to build camaraderie with your fans is through social media engagement, this includes:

  • Respond to questions or comments received on your social pages
  • Find and engage with social posts where your wines or winery have been tagged
  • Recognize and build relationships with highly engaged fans
  • Support sommeliers that love your wines
  • Pay attention to adjacent topics your fans are interested in besides wine, and work that into your communications

Through well-executed community management, we’ve seen fan growth on social media pages of up to 10% month over month, without any advertising spend.

Winery DTC is maturing

The much-anticipated Wine Direct to Consumer Shipping Report compiled by Sovos and Wines & Vines was released in concert with General Manager Larry Cormier’s keynote speech this year. Larry pointed out that legal winery DTC states comprise 95% of the US population, and the remaining 5 illegal states will not add much to sales growth. So while the growth rates are still in the double digits, future rates are likely to slow.

But there’s still plenty of room for expansion

One could assume that as the DTC category matures and grows at somewhat less-torrid rates than year’s past, the average bottle price would drop. Not so; it rose 2.4% to nearly $40/bottle, which is about 4x the average bottle price sold through the retail channel. And there appears to be a lot of upside outside California, which comprises 12% of US population but a robust 30% of DTC winey sales by volume.

What form will competition take?

While many, if not most, wineries invest in creating experiences for guests, average visits per winery are dropping. Future revenue growth is likely to be less correlated with onsite visitor counts. What does this mean? Probably more flexible and personalized subscription benefits, better digital marketing, and possibly more “in-market” activations such as wine dinners and consumer events.  Certainly it will help to further professionalize the use of existing tactics (email, SEO, etc.), but we believe it will take broader marketing strategies to really move the needle for brands, such as a tighter integration of 3-tier and DTC marketing strategies.

Benson Drives Languedoc Sales in 2019

Continuing a decade-long relationship with the Conseil Interprofessionnel des Vins du Languedoc, Benson has been retained to execute trade focused programs for the region and its wines in the U.S. in 2019. These programs mix a focus on educating buyers about this fast growing category along with on and off premise sales promotions reaching consumers.

A highlight of this year’s activities will be the inaugural Languedoc Wines National Sommelier Challenge, established in recognition of the importance of education to the on-premise community, and its effect on sales and placements for the category. The Challenge will test knowledge of the region and its wines through a written exam and blind tasting portion. The events will also offer an opportunity to taste Languedoc AOC wines currently available in each market. Challenge events will take place in select U.S. cities in June (3-12), and culminate in an all-expenses paid trip to the region for the winners, to further their knowledge and connection to Languedoc, in September 2019. More information and registration can be found at https://languedocadventure.com/events/national-sommelier-challenge-2019/

Languedoc is the largest wine region in France offering an incredible diversity of wines and wine styles. The region is a leader in organic viticulture in France, accounting for over 30% of total production, as well as production of rosé wines. In fact, Languedoc surpasses Provence in volume of rosé wines produced. At the top end of the spectrum, the Crus du Languedoc wines represent the highest quality the region has to offer. Languedoc AOC wines have consistently shown exceptional growth in the U.S. market, further reinforcing the need for today’s sommeliers and buyers to have a strong understanding of this category.

Wine Marketing: Napa Valley Style

Under new leadership, Napa Valley’s legendary Clos Du Val winery began its current transformation in the vineyards four years ago, focusing on estate wines and production investments. The winery’s evolution continued this fall with the opening of a new visitor center, called the Hirondelle House, and a new set of guest experiences.

Hirondelle House is drop dead gorgeous. It welcomes guests into a chic setting adjacent to vineyards and winery production. The message is clear: Clos Du Val wants to connect guests emotionally to not only its wines, but also to its estate vineyards. The room is modern but cozy, providing conversational nooks, a variety of tasting options, and a seamless inside/outside design featuring a 60-foot sliding glass door and 3,000 square foot patio. You want to stay, wander around, and explore. Designed by Michael Guthrie & Co Architects, with interiors by Erin Martin Design, it’s the latest must-visit winery in the Napa Valley.

“Guest expectations have changed over the last decade, and wineries also need to evolve,” stated Clos Du Val President and CEO Steve Tamburelli, echoing a larger trend in retail away from a transactional point of view and toward an experience POV.  Over the past decade or so, onsite winery marketing in Napa Valley, and elsewhere, increasingly centers on creating an experience that connects guests emotionally with the winery and its wines, and the winery’s unique “sparkle” that makes it compelling.  Visitors are spending more time at each winery, which drives down the average wineries visited per day, but deepens the memories of each visit.

This trend is now prevalent with specialty retailers, too. For example, home furnishings retailer Restoration Hardware now has a restaurant in Napa Valley. For an interesting read on this trend, visit  https://www.adweek.com/brand-marketing/specialty-retailers-are-getting-into-the-restaurant-business/