The Big Pivot: How Wine Marketers are Adapting to Coronavirus. Some Wine DTC, PR and Social Media Tactics to Consider.

As we write this on March 19, it has been a remarkably hectic 7 days or so helping clients adapt to the Coronavirus (COVID19) pandemic.

In summary, it’s been a “big pivot” for the supplier tier.

While we don’t pretend to have all the answers, we wanted to share a selection of marketing ideas our team, our clients and others are executing (we hope to get to a spirits post soon). And, while this may sound overly optimistic today, what steps can we take to emerge stronger marketers, post-pandemic?

Social Media Community Management, Digital

  • Reviewing Editorial Calendars Daily: While ensuring our tone is appropriate and empathetic, we are adjusting our content and CTAs on a much shorter cycle, in most cases, daily.
  • Reassessing Ad Strategy: Reviewing all social ads for appropriateness and relevance and, in some cases, simply stopping them.
  • Developing Content that Provides a Break from the News: For example, short video clips of harvest or bud break can provide some relief. Pre-recorded video or live, video tells a compelling story.
  • Identifying “Safe” Content Themes: We put them into four buckets: lead with gratitude, show the human side, make the virtual connection, and share moments of joy.
  • ID Facebook Ads that Work: To borrow from marketer Andrea Vahl, ads that work include those that offer positive messages, messages of the community, and distractions for homebound people with time on their hands.
  • Teasing Hashtag Holidays: We’d promote and support #WorldMalbecDay (April 17) anyway, but since it provides a delicious diversion, why not couple it with a DTC offer, livecast, etc.?

DTC Offers

There’s a lot of creativity out there, not surprisingly, as this sales channel will need to play a larger role for many companies. Here is a sampling:

  • Virtual Tastings: Of course, many winemakers are doing online tastings (or video) focusing on newly released wines and wine club shipments.
  • Shipping Discounts, Delivery Options: Many winery offers are in the range of reduced cost shipping (1 cent to $10) on 6 bottles or more, or orders exceeding a range of $75 or $100. There are many variants, but we’ve seen several in that range. Vinography blogger Alder Yarrow provides a large roundup here. Jancis Robinson has listed 500+ retailers around the globe offering home delivery here. We’re sure there are many more such listings.
  • Win-Win Partnerships: Offer gift cards to a food delivery service as part of your wine club shipment to “surprise and delight” your members, and support local restaurants.

Some of these ideas are also suggested in Rob McMillan’s good post, “SVB on Wine,” here.

Wine PR

  • Put Your CEO Glasses On: While tactics have pivoted, we need to ensure PR tactics achieve overall business goals. Review tactics through that lens.
  • Check-in with Writers: While blanket story pitches are verboten at any time, it is a good time to check in with writers — using short emails! — asking how we can help.
  • Virtual Press Interviews: No surprise here – we are rescheduling media trips to New York and other markets, turning them into web calls.
  • Regional Press Trips: Rescheduling spring press trips to the fall — both inside the US and to our international clients —with “go, no-go” decision deadlines of May 1 or June 1.
  • Sampling: Revisiting our calendars and release schedules to accommodate reviewers.
  • Philanthropy: As during other economic shocks, we will certainly see creative opportunities for wineries and others to support fundraising actions for our friends on-premise.
  • Sharing Info: For you PR pros, here’s some advice from Cision on communicating during a crisis.

Working with Agencies During a Crisis

While it is not business as usual, most agencies like ours are designed to be  purposefully agile, with a technology infrastructure intentionally mobile. For wineries, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Nothing is “Out of Scope:” A crisis demands a broader, more integrated set of agency services, so we’re providing DTC work when we might only be hired for PR, and vice versa. Suggestion: pull your agency into your decision-making process early.
  • Keep Calm and Market On! At Benson, we’ve worked with clients impacted by fires, earthquakes, a Great Recession, 9/11, etc. Suggestion: Now is not the time to draw back from communicating with your consumers and trading partners, as was nicely expressed by WineGlass Marketing here.
  • Agility is King: Email is great but can be distracting and can slow decision-making. We always lean into phone/web calls for more rapid info-sharing and decision-making during dynamic times. And we give our teams the freedom to turn off Slack, Teams, email and other tech so they can focus on priorities

Let’s take care of each other, and ourselves, as we live through this dynamic time.

Questions? We’re here to help. Contact Jeremy at benson@bensonmarketing.com, 707.738.6520, or you can chat from our website.

Related Post: 11 Ways to Adapt Your Winery Social Media During the Coronavirus Pandemic.

Biltmore Wines Taps Benson

Biltmore, the estate in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville, N.C. was the family home of George Vanderbilt in the late 1800s.  Originally 125,000 acres, the property’s estate sits on 8,000 acres and was a well-known gathering place for artists and scientists entertained in grand style.

George Vanderbilt introduced the pleasures of wine to Biltmore through his legendary hospitality, but it was his grandson, William Amherst Vanderbilt Cecil, who had the vision and determination to take Biltmore’s agricultural tradition and re-imagine it as vineyards and a winery. A winery seemed like a natural extension of Biltmore’s agricultural legacy as well as a viable means of diversifying Biltmore’s revenue-generating possibilities. Viticultural experiments began in the 1970s and, in 1983, Biltmore Estate Wine Company was launched.

Today, Biltmore produces a custom portfolio of wines. Its grapes are sourced from estate vineyards, and select grape growers in North Carolina and California. Crafted by winemaker Sharon Fenchak (pictured), Biltmore wines are sold throughout the property’s restaurants and tasting bars, in many states at retail and direct to consumer.

Benson is working with Biltmore Wines on a messaging and communications campaign to highlight the brand’s unique history and range of offerings.